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2012 December 15 Saturday
Sweden: The Liberal Blank Slate Caricature

Christina Hoff Sommers on the Swedish war against boys.

Is it discriminatory and degrading for toy catalogs to show girls playing with tea sets and boys with Nerf guns? A Swedish regulatory group says yes. The Reklamombudsmannen (RO) has reprimanded Top-Toy, a licensee of Toys"R"Us and one of the largest toy companies in Northern Europe, for its "outdated" advertisements and has pressured it to mend its "narrow-minded" ways. After receiving "training and guidance" from RO equity experts, Top-Toy introduced gender neutrality in its 2012 Christmas catalogue. The catalog shows little boys playing with a Barbie Dream House and girls with guns and gory action figures. As its marketing director explains, "For several years, we have found that the gender debate has grown so strong in the Swedish market that we have had to adjust."

Yet even vervet monkey boys and girls prefer different toys.

In 2002, Gerianne M. Alexander of Texas A&M University and Melissa Hines of City University in London stunned the scientific world by showing that vervet monkeys showed the same sex-typical toy preferences as humans.

Never mind the overwhelming evidence for biological causes of innate cognitive differences between the sexes. Boys and girls think differently. Yet in Sweden the tabula rasa mythology still rules and oppresses. So many people on the America Left point to Sweden as the model of how America could be more utopian. Try dystopian.

Think of Sweden from a utilitarian perspective. It serves the same function as North Korea by demonstrating how freer rein of an ideology will play out in purer form. Don't want to live there. But it provides a laboratory which you can peer into.

Share |      By Randall Parker at 2012 December 15 10:47 AM 


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