2011 October 30 Sunday
The Best Steve Jobs Eulogy Comes From His Sister

Read Mona Simpson on Steve Jobs.

One time when Steve had contracted a tenacious pneumonia his doctor forbid everything — even ice. We were in a standard I.C.U. unit. Steve, who generally disliked cutting in line or dropping his own name, confessed that this once, he’d like to be treated a little specially.

I told him: Steve, this is special treatment.

He leaned over to me, and said: “I want it to be a little more special.”

Intubated, when he couldn’t talk, he asked for a notepad. He sketched devices to hold an iPad in a hospital bed. He designed new fluid monitors and x-ray equipment. He redrew that not-quite-special-enough hospital unit. And every time his wife walked into the room, I watched his smile remake itself on his face.

Death is loss. Death is defeat. Death is waste when a mind is valuable.

Share |      By Randall Parker at 2011 October 30 05:49 PM  Life And Death


Comments
Sambo said at October 30, 2011 8:19 PM:

And many, many people of a darker shade will outlive him and contribute nothing but crime, filth and stupidity.

Alex said at October 30, 2011 11:29 PM:

He was overrated. He was a salesman and showman, kind of like Billy Mays. He didn't invent or create anything. He was an Arab anyway, so his aggressive con artistry is no surprise.

solaris said at October 31, 2011 8:12 AM:

Death is necessary. Death is a part of life.

Demolition Man said at October 31, 2011 8:14 PM:

Alex wrote: "He was an Arab anyway, so his aggressive con artistry is no surprise. "
----------------------

But Steve Jobs was only half-Arab (his mother was not an Arab).

http://www.biography.com/people/steve-jobs-9354805
EXCERPT:
-------------------
"Steven Paul Jobs was born on February 24, 1955, to Joanne Simpson and Abdulfattah "John" Jandali, two University of Wisconsin graduate students who gave their unnamed son up for adoption. His father, Abdulfattah Jandali, was a Syrian political science professor and his mother, Joanne Simpson, worked as a speech therapist. Shortly after Steve was placed for adoption, his biological parents married and had another child, Mona Simpson. It was not until Jobs was 27 that he was able to uncover information on his biological parents."
-------------------

But in particular, Steve Jobs grew up only with his adoptive parents who were not genetically related to him. Steve Jobs did not meet his biological father until he grew up, and as such, he was not culturally influenced by his biological father.


Maybe you are applying the definition of Blacks in the United States: usually people like Obama who are 50 % white are still called Black. But then, had Obama married a white woman, his children would be only 25 % Black, but they would probably be called Black anyway, since Obama was known as Black.

WJ said at November 2, 2011 8:36 PM:

It's interesting that in the Jobs obits we hear much about the biological family he wasn't raised with or by, but nothing of the adoptive parents who raised him or the adopted sister he was raised with. Are his adoptive parents both dead? Is his adopted sister dead? It seems that the supposedly nurture-over-nature press doesn't much care.

Death is not waste, loss, nor defeat for the next generation, for whom there would eventually be no room if the aged don't die.

Anyway, I've been wondering - if a man lived to be 1,000 or 10,000 or 1 million years old, where would his mind make room for new memories? Will he carry around an auxiliary brain? Will we ever be able to get electronic memory to mimic human memory, and will it be too much for our brains to make use of? Will a man who lives to be a million remember the name of his mother, or what she looked like, or where he attended elementary school, or will he have to forget such trivial matters to make room for more important things?


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