2011 March 10 Thursday
Egyptian Muslim Persecution Of Coptic Christians

How exciting that the Egyptians rose up to overthrow a tyrant. This provided lots of video footage and thrills about the power of social media web sites. But then what happened with the Egyptians? Freedom from a dictator gave them greater freedom to abuse and kill Christians.

But such idealism might be waning as Egyptians confront the worst outbreak of religious violence since Hosni Mubarak was swept out of power Feb. 11. The deaths of 13 people in clashes in Cairo between Muslims and Christians late Tuesday have prompted calls for religious tolerance and raised the prospect of a deepening sectarian divide after a post-revolution honeymoon period.

Street battles broke out after Coptic Christians set up roadblocks in major arteries to protest the destruction of one of their churches. Security is scant in this metropolis of 18 million, where the military-controlled government is still groping to find a way to tamp down crime with no functioning police force.

The Copts say the Egyptian army stood by for hours while Muslims killed Christians. The Copts did not want to see Mubarak ousted because Mubarak did a better (though far from perfect) job of protecting them from Muslims than they expect the next Egyptian government to do. That's reasonable. Why expect a government elected by an overwhelming Muslim majority to protect a non-Muslim minority?

Reacting to the assassination of the Christian minority minister in Pakistan Razib says he's not holding his breathe in expectation that Muslims will stop persecuting non-Muslims.

Let’s ignore the blatant whitewashing of what being dhimmi under Muslim “protection” entailed. The teachings of Muhammad are irrelevant. Many of us think that the Muslim religion, like all religions, is a human fiction. Those of us who are not Muslim, the majority of his audience, think that the religion is false in most of its premises. Islam is what most Muslims believe, say, and do. Eboo Patel is not the Muslim pope who can adjudicate this. The fact is that the majority of Pakistani Muslims seem to support, or do not object to, these actions against dissenters from the theocratic consensus. Are they all then not Muslims? The word “Muslim” loses all meaning if that is so.

I don’t care about the “real Islam,” or what “Islam teaches.” All I care is that Muslims stop engaging in active persecution of non-Muslims. All I care is that Muslims march out into the streets and take back their public spaces in nations where they are the majority from the thugs. I’m not holding my breath. Though I’ll take notice when Eboo Patel and his acolytes of the true tolerant Islam go to Muslim majority nations and make clear to them the error of their ways….

What do you call an outspoken moderate in Pakistan? Dead.

Share |      By Randall Parker at 2011 March 10 11:38 PM  Civilizations Clash Of


Comments
Mercer said at March 11, 2011 7:42 AM:

" Mubarak did a better (though far from perfect) job of protecting them from Muslims than they expect the next Egyptian government to do. That's reasonable. Why expect a government elected by an overwhelming Muslim majority to protect a non-Muslim minority?"

The same thing could be said about replacing Saddam with a democratic government. The Christian community there is being destroyed. I don't hear American Christians complain about the fate of their fellow Christians in Iraq. I guess they place a higher priority on defending Bush's invasion then they do on the lives of Iraq Christians.

miles said at March 11, 2011 9:24 AM:

Rough stuff, but perfectly predictable. Just as what will happen in Europe in 40 years is also perfectly predictable if Muslim immigration isn't curtailed or halted.


Frankly Im so cynical to think that our elites would like for their to be some violence so that they have an excuse to expand their surveillance and extra-constitutional powers over more the more remote parts of people's personal lives. Every bombing, rape, gang-beating, gun massacre will probably move public sentiment towards the acceptance of the surveillance (both physical and cyber) state. The elites win (for now), but the Muslims still do have that Quaddaffi-esque baby bomb. What about in 200 years Euro/American/Canadian/Russian elites? Your great-great grandchildren might really be sad folk, forced to wear veils.

no i don't said at March 11, 2011 2:38 PM:

"How exciting that the Egyptians rose up to overthrow a tyrant."

Yes, agree.

Of course it would've been great for Egyptians to have risen a lot sooner, -like 20 years ago- but Mubarak had the full support of the U.S. all this while, so they couldn't. A little like what's happening now with Lybia and once upon a time also... Saddam. And that's History.

Wolf-Dog said at March 12, 2011 9:33 PM:

With some rare exceptions, in a Middle Eastern democracy, in general the majority will vote to kill the minority. The poor Coptic Christians in Egypt were better off with Mubarak.


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