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2014 September 12 Friday
Marxism Lifts Up Kurdish Women In Middle East

The Marxists of the Kurdish Worker's Party are the biggest force for women's rights in the Middle East

It was as a young woman in the rugged mountains of southeast Turkey and northern Iraq that Avesta says she discovered herself. "It was in the mountains that I found out women can be also powerful," said Avesta. The ranks of the PKK, a Marxist organization, are filled with women, a rarity in the conservative cultures of the Muslim world. About half of the organization's leaders are women. And the Kurdish guerrilla group stands in especially stark contrast to the radical fundamentalism of the Islamic State, which confines women's role to mostly domestic tasks such as raising children, cooking, cleaning, and pleasing their husbands.

All the people who think Marxism belongs to the dust heap of history are so obviously wrong. I was wrong too. But now I see the error my my ways.

There are plenty of female Kurdish soldiers on the front lines. They’re smaller than their male comrades, but they talk just as tough as they prowl the battlefield clutching automatic rifles and vowing vengeance for those victimized by the Islamic State.

“We are equal with the men,” said Zekia Karhan, 26, a female guerrilla from Turkey who is with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, known as the PKK. “Every responsibility for a man is the same for a woman. We are treated equally, and that is why we are fighting.”

Marxism is doing more to elevate the status of women in the Middle East than anything the United States has done. In fact,, the US interventions have worsened the plight of women, Christians, and Yezidis.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 12 10:16 PM 
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2014 September 11 Thursday
Fun Time Machine Trips

A cool thing to do with a time machine: go back to 1750 American colonies with designs for low tech mechanical cotton pickers. The rise in slave cotton picker productivity probably made slavery expand by increasing the ROI from owning slave labor. But a huge increase in cotton harvesting productivity would have caused the opposite effect: less need for slaves on cotton plantations. Collapse of demand for slaves in the Old South would have put the US on a very different trajectory. The US civil war, with over a half million dead and a big expansion of federal power, would have been avoided.

Another fun trip: Go back to the 1913 Austro-Hungarian Empire and kill Stalin, Lenin, Trotsky, and Hitler. Then sneak into Sarajevo and kill the assassins of the Crown Prince Franz Ferdinand and avoid that cause of World War I. An early death for Gavrilo Princip and his confederates would have at least delayed the start of World War I. But could the war be avoided by time travelers?

My favorite fun trip idea: go back and prevent Julius Caesar's assassination. How would the rise of the Roman Empire be altered? Is there any way a time traveler could delay the decline of the Roman Empire by centuries? How? Could soil conservation policies have done the trick?

By Randall Parker 2014 September 11 09:20 PM 
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America's Diverse Allies In Iraq Against ISIS

Supporting diverse factions in Iraq is the best way to pretend we can construct a more inclusive central government in Baghdad.

“The ground coalitions we’re supporting with air power are uniquely different in each case,” said Doug Ollivant, a former advisor to Gen. David Petraeus who served in the National Security Council under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. “In Sinjar, it’s largely the PKK [a Kurdish militia] who rescued the Yazidis,” Ollivant said. “In Mosul, it was the Golden Brigades [An elite unit of the Iraqi army] with the Peshmerga in support, and in Amerli it looks like Shia militias with the Iraqi military in support.

Some of those Shia militias are backed by Iran. Some have Iranian Shias fighting with them.

The Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) is considered to be terrorists for how they oppose Turkish rule over Kurds. But PKK female fighters are totally cool. Plus some of the Jihadists are afraid if they are killed by a woman they won't get the big reward of many beautiful women in heaven. I say we arm the PKK women warriors with shoulder-launched rocket launchers, armored vehicles, and anything else they want.

Also, we should arm the Kurdish women fighters in Syria and when the United States extends the air war to Syria the Kurdish warrior women could escort the US special forces that will call in the air strikes.

US journalists should step up and find the sexiest Kurdish women fighters and show us their pictures in action using fancy American weapons.

Just as the feminist web sites are ignoring Rotherham UK rapes of early teen girls by Pakistani Muslims are they also ignoring the Kurdish warrior women? Nothing quite says sexual liberation like a a Kurdish woman getting an ISIS jihadist in the crosshairs of a sniper scope.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 11 08:13 PM 
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2014 September 07 Sunday
Peter Frost: No Single Natural Law

Peter Frost argues there is no universally accepted set of innate beliefs about right and wrong behavior. Natural selection and local circumstances have generated big differences in what people see as acceptable human behavior.

Human societies similarly differ in their treatment of murder. There is a general tendency to limit the taking of human life, but the variability is considerable. In some societies, murder is so rare that instances of it are thought to be pathological. The murderer is said to be "sick." In other societies, every adult male has the right to use violence to settle personal disputes, even to the point of killing. If he abdicates that right, he's no longer a real man.

The same "problem" will thus be solved in different ways in different places. Over time, each society will develop a "solution" that favors the survival and reproduction of certain people with a certain personality type and certain predispositions. So there is no single human nature, any more than a single Natural Law. Instead, there are many human natures with varying degrees of overlap./p>

Universal religions that purport to speak to everyone about how to live their lives are built on the false assumption of a common shared human nature. Someone who has a propensity for violence or a brilliant psychopath who enjoys causing emotional pain isn't going to hear a conscience compartment of their brain telling them they are doing a bad thing. Some people can kill, steal, manipulate, and torture (either physical or more common emotional varieties) without any feelings of remorse or guilt.

Or take jealousy. As Peter Frost points out, nudity taboos will vary depending on the amount of sexual competition. People with stronger innate desires for monogamy will be less influenced by nudity than those who are innately promiscuous. So rules surrounding clothing and protection of single females will vary considerably from society to society.

As an illustration of just how much innate reactions on moral issues differ look at the sex abuse and rape of hundreds of girls by Pakistani Muslims men in Rotherham England. The police were afraid or restrained from cracking down and doing mass arrests out of fear of appearing racists. Hey, lots of leftists in Britain think not appearing racist is more important than protecting 13 year old girls from rape by lots of taxi drivers. They really think this way. Yet this reaction is extremely foreign to my own thinking and deeply repugnant to me. I know I differ from these people on the political Left in some very fundamental way. I couldn't bring myself to react the way they can. Their reaction is proof that big innate differences in moral reasoning exist in human brains.

I think the rapes in Rotherham and Rochdale, Derby, and Oxford as well as leftist spin against blame speak to large differences in moral reasoning modules of the brain. There is no universal human nature and the idea of universal values shared by all is a dangerous illusion.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 07 12:11 PM 
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2014 September 04 Thursday
2007 Incomes: The Good Old Days For 90+ Percent Of Americans

A report from the US Federal Reserve, Survey of Consumer Finance, finds that only the top end have recovered their incomes back to levels they had before the big recession and financial crisis took hold in 2008.

“Families defined as middle to upper-middle class (which fall between the 40th and 90th income percentiles) “saw little change in average real incomes” between 2010 and 2013 and consequently have failed to recover the losses experienced between 2007 and 2010, the report said..

Do not be complacent about your career. Find a way up or you are going to go down.

Sharply declining incomes for those on the lower cognitive rungs.

The always observed correlation between education and income were as pronounced as ever, with median income for those with a high school diploma or less falling between 6% and 9%, and for those without a high-school diploma falling 17%. Those with a college degree saw income improve, but not much, just 1%.

The US middle class peaked in the late 1990s,

Median household income in 2012 was $51,017, meaning that half of all households make less than that number. Adjusted for inflation, that number is about $7,000 below where it stood in the late 1990s.

The full report is here.

People who lose their jobs get back into the economy at a lower rung.

New York -- Jobs gained during the economic recovery from the Great Recession pay an average 23% less than the jobs lost during the recession according to a new report released today by The U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM) under the leadership of President Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson. The annual wage in sectors where jobs were lost during the downturn was $61,637, but new jobs gained through the second quarter of 2014 showed average wages of only $47,171. This wage gap represents $93 billion in lost wages.

Under a similar analysis conducted by the Conference of Mayors during the 2001-2002 recession, the wage gap was only 12% compared to the current 23% -- meaning the wage gap has nearly doubled from one recession to the next.

If you lost your job could you get another one that pays as well? If the answer No then think hard about how to change that.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 04 08:57 PM 
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2014 September 02 Tuesday
NATO Response To Russia Will Be Mostly Bluster

Some people think Vladimir Putin has done NATO (at least the organization) a favor by invading Ukraine. But will NATO member countries boost their very low defense spending? I doubt it. Their rapidly aging populations want tax revenues to flow to them, not to defense budgets. Plus, they think they can rely on American taxpayers put up the money to keep them safe.

I think Russia will either turn Ukraine into a semi-neutral country that won't make trade deals with Europe or he will peel off another Russian-speaking piece of Ukraine and leave the rest much more Ukrainian and possibly therefore more Euro-leaning.

The WaPo editorial board wants NATO countries to arm Ukraine with anti-tank weapons, anti-aircraft weapons, and drones. You can bet that European countries aren't going to spend a lot of their money on arming Ukraine, what with big welfare states to fund and stagnant economies. So should the US spend some billion dollars to arm Ukraine with enough stuff to crush Russian tank columns? How much would it cost to do that?

Europe won't do much.

But some analysts said Europe would not go beyond sanctions. “They have to do something because Putin is behaving badly,” said Charles Grant, director of the Center for European Reform, “but it’s all they can do.”

The Russians could cause European economic collapse just by not selling energy. Of course, that would cause the Russian economy to crater as well. But it isinstructive to see just how much of imported energy in Europe comes from Russia. Germany and Belgium at 30% of imported energy each from Russia are pretty vulnerable. But Poland at 91% and Lithuania at 92% are in a whole nuther realm of vulnerable.

If Europe was seriously scared of the Russian bear it could build nuclear power plants, wind farms, and lots of PV roofing as well as mandate a substantial fraction of new cars be electric.

Ukraine is so dependent on Russian energy that it would not surprise me if Ukraine comes out of this as a client state to Russia.

The Baltic countries are feeling very vulnerable at this point.

Still, some NATO members, like Estonia, say what’s needed is more than a new force.

“For us, it would be important that both NATO and the U.S. would be present in our region as long as Russia is continuing its aggressive policies. So we’re talking about continuous or more sustainable presence of both NATO and the U.S. in the region," said Tanel Sepp, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Estonia.

Estonia’s chief of mission to the U.S. tells VOA his country already has adequate facilities, including one of the most modern military airfields in northern Europe.

Europe needs to either kick its dependence on Russian energy or become big time apologists for whatever the Russians want to do.

Update: Let me separate two different concerns here: First, American national interest in Ukraine is small. America loses little if Ukraine never joins NATO or the EU and if instead Russia's influence and involvement in Ukraine grows. At the same time, imagine it really did matter for America and Europe what becomes of Ukraine. Well, Europe is too dependent on Russian oil to seriously put the screws to Russia's economy. There is a large mutual dependence between EU countries and Russia. Plus, the aging populations in EU countries and their economic problems weigh much more in the minds of their politicians and publics.

Given the circumstances why did the US government and some EU governments push for incorporating Ukraine into the EU? Faith in secular liberal manifest destiny? Just because they could play games playing with a country while pretty much giving the Russians a contemptuous glare? Or was the crisis made to order to prop up military spending? It is certainly going to do that in the United States and keep NATO feeling purposeful. I would opt for the manufactured crisis theory if I was more sure of the ability of some people in Washington DC to carry out such a clever subterfuge for several years.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 02 07:58 PM 
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2014 September 01 Monday
Daniel Larison: Do Not Arm Ukraine

Since we really are not willing to fight for Ukraine Western governments never should have encouraged Ukraine to break free from Russia's orbit.

Several Western governments carelessly pursued a contest for influence with Russia in Ukraine without having any intention of dedicating the resources or taking the risks that such a contest required, and they did so without ever considering how negatively Russia would react to the attempt. Now that we can see how disastrously this has turned out, it makes absolutely no sense to repeat the error by encouraging Ukraine to fight an unwinnable war.

Which governments encouraged Ukraine to take a line that earned Putin's wrath? Was the Obama government one of the governments encouraging Ukraine? My (admittedly vague) impression was that the US State Department was for a trade deal between the EU and Ukraine.

Then Ukraine will have to maintain tariffs on Western goods and buy lousier stuff from Russia instead.

What I find interesting about Ukraine and also China in the South China Sea: There are limits to how far the United States will go to protect a country that wants to be free of undemocratic bully neighboring countries. The US will not protect Ukraine or, for that matter, some of China's nearest neighbors. Quite a few countries and ethnicities are going to (and in some cases already have) get into and stay in submissive positions toward Russia and China.

By Randall Parker 2014 September 01 10:48 AM 
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2014 August 30 Saturday
Imagine Obama And Cameron Had A Strategy On Iraq And Syria

Writing in Al Arabiya Raghida Dergham says some people think the British and American governments really do have a strategy in Iraq and Syria. I am in favor of this strategy. But I do not think Barack Obama or David Cameron are up to conceiving, much less executing on this strategy.

The Anglo-American duo is accused of devising a strategy and plans to lure American and British terrorists to Iraq and Syria to keep them away from American cities and bog them down in the battlefield at a cost borne by Syrians and Iraqis, rather than the Americans and the British.

It seems more plausible that Putin supports Assad's government as a way to pull Chechen jihadists to the Middle East.

At the same time, the Russian leadership consents to this approach, because President Vladimir Putin, too, wants to keep Russian, Chechen, and other terrorists from neighboring countries away from his geographical backyard, and is determined to keep them busy fighting in Syria.

Russia's historical circumstances select for ruthless and realistic Russian leaders. American leaders and elites can afford to delude themselves and their citizens and they fully avail themselves of their opportunities for delusion.

But I try to think about the real world and what would make Western countries better. Unfortunately, my ideas are all outside the liberal-patrolled Overton Window. For example, I think we should give free airplane tickets to any Jihadist with citizenships in Western countries who wants to fight in Syria or Iraq. Then put well concealed and highly mobile special forces on the ground to direct air strikes.

Update: The guy who definitely has a strategy: Bashar al-Assad. The fear of death can powerfully concentrate the mind. I've read that for years he concentrated his forces against his more secular opposition while letting ISIS/ISIL/Daash/IS grow in power. Why? Because he took away from the West the sort of opposition they would would delude themselves into thinking would be secular once in power. Now the West is faced with a far clearer enemy in the Islamic Caliphate of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and the US is considering an air war in Syria against Assad's main opposition. Assad's strategy might work.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 30 10:25 AM 
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US Citizens Who Are Not Americans

We need to separate the legal from the actual. Jihadists with US citizenship are not Americans.

WASHINGTON — American intelligence and law enforcement agencies have identified nearly a dozen Americans who have traveled to Syria to fight for the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the militant group that the Obama administration says poses the greatest threat to the United States since Al Qaeda before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

What does it mean to be an American? If the term "American" is to have any meaning at all it can not include everybody. It can not include any person who wants to use US citizenship as a convenience who actually favors the abolition of American freedoms the fundamental attributes of Americans.

Jihadists are not Americans. Any US citizen who has their primary allegiance elsewhere (or even only to a group within US borders which rejects America) is not an American. The legal status does not make the person. The legal status is just a tool the person uses.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 30 09:50 AM 
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2014 August 28 Thursday
Venezuela Still Deteriorating From Socialism

Venezuela is still deteriorating. Drug supplies are going down. Alicia Torres deserves what she voted for but the opposition doesn't.

But even hard-core Chávistas aren’t convinced. “How much further can we sink?” says Alicia Torres, a 53-year-old housewife in Caracas who voted for Maduro in special elections last year and now regrets her decision. “I spend hours in line each day, waiting for products to arrive. Maduro is killing the country with his ineptitude.”

Chavez and Maduro did unsustainable boosts in government spending to make the lower class want to vote for them. The lower class isn't bright enough to understand their support was bought in a way that made the long term worse.

"It wasn't so hard two years ago," said Geraldine, citing the cost of a refrigerator that has risen to 22,000 bolivars from 1,700. "This all happened because Chavez died. He left us a president who doesn't know anything. Chavez knew how to get things done."

Will the United States some day reach the point where its voters and politicians will interact in a way that is as destructive as what is happening in Venezuela? Venezuela has the highest inflation rate in the world.

Annual inflation reached 60.9 percent in May, the fastest in the world, while gross domestic product probably shrank 2.1 percent in the second quarter, according to the median of economist forecasts compiled by Bloomberg.

It is becoming harder for the more productive and skilled Venezuelans to flee. Airlines have cut half their flights to Venezuela due to currency controls on revenue. I bet some of the more skilled Venezuelans wish they had fled a few years ago before conditions got this bad. It is important to know when to flee. Many Venezuelans say they feel trapped in their country.

The talented people in messed up countries need a sort of Galt's Gulch country which imposes minimum IQ requirements for entry.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 28 07:42 PM 
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2014 August 25 Monday
Chechens: The Brains And Skills Behind ISIS?

US special forces soldiers want to mix it up on the ground with ISIS. ISIS are considered to be talented fighters. Why? Chechens went to Syria and taught them how.

Where did ISIS learn such sophisticated military methods, shown clearly after the first shots were fired?

"Probably the Chechens," one of the U.S. officials said.

The whole article is interesting. Some members of US special forces want to go into battle against ISIS.

One Chechen-led group is advertising their training camp on Youtube.

A new jihadist group known as the Jamaat Ahadun Ahad, or the Group of the One and Only, has released a video of its training camp in Syria. The group is led by a Chechen commander and includes fighters from Chechnya, Europe, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan and several Arab countries.

The Chechens are dangerous. They've fought the Russians hard. A couple of them killed lots of people in Boston at a marathon. But we no longer have effective cultural defenses against them at home.

I do not know how big a role the Chechens have played in raising the game of Jihadists in Syria and Iraq. But something raised their game. Chechens? Albanians? If you come across any useful insights on why a ISIS is a much more capable fighting force than assorted militias that came before them please provide a link in the comments.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 25 09:25 PM 
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2014 August 24 Sunday
Programming Bootcamps Boost Employment, Pay

If you are smart enough you can switch to a new occupation in a hurry.

Of those without a college degree and with no coding experience prior to their bootcamp, 71 percent now have a full-time programming job.

I'm guessing this report overstates the bump in pay and employment rates of people who go thru these bootcamps. Whether this will work for you depends on how smart you are, how motivated to study and practice, and where you live. Some areas have few employers of software developers.

My advice for people who want to switch into software development: try some online courses and books,. Then use what you learn to try developing your own web site. Keep adding more kinds of functionality as you go. You can start out with PHP and do simpler stuff. Then try to code up a backend in Go or Java.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 24 11:21 AM 
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2014 August 23 Saturday
Dark Triad Traits And Relationship Preferences

The Dark Triad personality traits: narcissism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism.

Specifically, narcissism was uniquely correlated with preferences for one-night stands and friends-with-benefits and psychopathy was uniquely correlated with preferences for booty-call relationships. Both narcissism and psychopathy were negatively correlated with preferences for serious romantic relationships.

Narcissists can be bothered to develop friendships to the point where friends-with-benefits becomes possible. Psychopaths don't want that much overhead. A booty call relationship where contact is only initiated when horny doesn't include much contact beyond the booty call.

What I want to know: Are the Dark Triad traits being selected for in industrialized societies?

By Randall Parker 2014 August 23 11:32 PM 
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Average 401k Retirement Account: Sign Of Future Oldster Poverty

Boomers have an average of $127k in their 401k accounts. That's way way short of what they need in their 50s and 60s.

Except for some government workers defined benefit retirement plans are road kill from the last 30 years of bankruptcies, mergers, buy-outs, and restructurings. Few companies are offering them.

Auto-enrollment is helping. But still a third of Americans have no retirement savings. You might think they are younger. But

About a quarter — 26% — of those ages 50 to 64 haven't started saving for retirement, the survey said; the figure was 33% of people 30 to 49 years old.

Some people are just expecting to work their entire lives. But their bodies won't hold out and neither will their skill sets. Brain aging especially makes that an unrealistic expectation. But even before taking that into account if one's job gets automated out of existence the learning curve to get back up to a comparable salary is so long that job losses in late middle age usually mean a much lower working salary for the rest of a person's working life.

Most humans lack the capacity to effectively plan and execute on a career and retirement strategy. Younger and less skilled generations are going to take the biggest hit.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 23 08:49 PM 
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2014 August 21 Thursday
Celebrity Charity Support Only Helps Celebrities

Celebrities are not good at helping causes.

Celebrity promotion of charities is ineffective at raising awareness, but can make the stars more popular with the public, new research says.

According to journal articles by three UK academics, "the ability of celebrity and advocacy to reach people is limited" and celebrities are "generally ineffective" at encouraging people to care about "distant suffering".

I think fatigue is a common reaction to suffering in various parts of the world. With the advent of really low cost cameras, the internet, and really cheap optical fiber we get bombarded with news and images about distant suffering. The worst places get the most attention. There is no shortage of sad stories when tragedies and moral outrages are sourced from a global market in news.

People watch celebrities play characters they admire, desire, or want to emulate. Lots of people have irrational emotional attachments to celebrities because we evolved before mass media could pour so many images and dramas into our brains.

Celebrities trying to draw attention to suffering to raise money go up against so many competing media events. They have a hard time getting heard above the background noise. Most do not come across as very articulate or persuasive when not reading a script written by someone else. Since some celebrities help some dubious charities that's not always a bad thing. What they support is a pretty mixed bag.

Speaking as someone who doesn't own a TV I find myself increasingly not recognizing celebrity pictures and names in news stories. This is great. I strongly recommend kicking TV. You'll withdraw from propaganda and from emotional attachments to actors who are really irrelevant to your lives.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 21 09:33 PM 
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2014 August 18 Monday
Disintegration Of Iraq: Already Or Future Event?

A WaPo opinion piece by Army Col. Joel Rayburn has a puzzling title: The coming disintegration of Iraq. The essay is actually quite good. But I do not understand the use of the future tense.

Let me try out a different phrasing: The Coming American elite acceptance of the disintegration of Iraq. The problem is that until American elite opinion adjusts to reality in Iraq the US will intervene to try to put Iraq back together and thereby lengthen the civil war. It would be far better to only intervene to help protect the weaker ethnic groups (e.g. Christians, Yazidis, Turkomen) so that the new countries could get formed under conditions where those ethnic groups do not get massively raped, enslaved, killed, and generally oppressed.

Rayburn is quite right that dividing up Iraq will force large numbers of people to move into more ethnically pure statelets. But if we can only accept the inevitable outcome we can greatly reduce the amount of death that comes with ethnic cleansing of Shiite and Sunni regions.

Yet another "inclusive" Iraqi cabinet with some American help isn't going to put Humpty Dumpty back together again, at least not with today's technology. The American people do not want to pay the price in blood or treasure and rightfully so. If the US military already had its 2035 or perhaps 2045 technology it could use cheap and really advanced drones and robots that can act on behalf of the Baghdad government to put down any attempt to secede from central control. But today the US lacks the tech to cheaply keep Iraq together. Plus, the US let Saddam get killed by the Iraqi government. So the US lacks a "partner for peace" who has the skill set needed to put Iraq back together.

By Randall Parker 2014 August 18 10:43 PM 
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